Saturday, December 29, 1973

Advent Calendar 2011 - Colors, Words, and Sources

For each of the 29 drawings in my Advent Calendar 2011, here are the Copic colors (and any other materials) that I used, the words, and the sources for quoted words. Unless noted otherwise, everything is drawn and written with black Copic multiliners, generally 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3.

Sun 11/27/2011 Words: We are leaving ordinary time
Source: In the church year, Advent is preceded by a long stretch of “ordinary time,” the summer and fall months after Pentecost. I used the same words to begin my 2010 Advent Calendar, my 2009 Advent Calendar and my 2008 Advent Calendar.
Colors: Custom colors YYR2000 and B2000, V20,25, RV66, Y06, YR21, YG21,61, G17, B45
Mon 11/28/2011 Words: Make straight in the desert a highway for our God
Source: Isaiah 40:3
Colors: B000,21,32, BG70,93, E41,43,81; cobalt and olive multiliners
Tues 11/29/11 Word: Joy
Colors: BV20, G28, YG63, B45,66, R02,24, E44
Wed 11/30/11 Words: A light shines
Source: Isaiah 9:2
Colors: Y21, YR30, BG10, B14,24,26,29
Thurs 12/1/11 Word: Veni
Source: Advent hymn "Veni Emmanuel" (O Come, O Come Emmanuel). For the complete words and hymn tune, click here.
Colors: V000,17,20,25, B000,21,63, BG53, RV95
Fri 12/2/11 Word: Await
Colors: YG61, G17,28, RV17,19,55
Sat 12/3/11 Words: The time is near
Colors: BG10,32, C1,3,5, E21,23,25,33,71; Sepia and cool gray copic multiliners; Micron brown

Sun 12/4/11 Word: Alleluia
Colors: Custom colors B2000 and YG6000, B26,45,63, V04,25, E95, YR30, R24,29,59, YG05,21, G07,17,21,28,29; Cobalt, purple, and cool gray Copic multiliners; Micron brown
Mon 12/5/11 Word: Hope
Colors: Custom color R290, BV04, B01,24,66, BG45, YG05, V000, YR07, Y19
Tues 12/6/11 (no word)
Colors: B41, Y11,21,26, YR21,30, R02, RV91, E000,11,15,37
Wed 12/7/11 Word: Behold
Source: See Wed 12/14
Colors: B45, Y26, YR30
Thurs 12/8/11 (no word)
Colors: B41, Y11,21,26, YR21,30, R02, RV91, E000,09,11,25
Fri 12/9/11 Words: Wake, watch
Colors: Custom color YYR2000, V17, BG72, E25,29
Sat 12/10/11 Word: Peace
Colors: G07, YG05,23, RV06,55

Sun 12/11/11 Words: Cast away the works of darkness, O ye children of the day.
Source: Advent hymn, "Hark! a thrilling voice is sounding" - verse 1. For the complete words and hymn tune, click here
Colors: R02, Y11, B26, RV34, BV31, E11,53,81,87
Mon 12/12/11 Words: Restore us, O God of hosts
Source: Psalm 80:7, a Psalm associated with Advent, beginning "Give ear, O Shepherd of Israel, you who lead Joseph like a flock"
Colors: G28, B21, V000,20,25, BG53, RV95
Tues 12/13/11 (no word)
Colors: B41,45, RV95, Y11,21, YR21,30
Wed 12/14/11 Words: A great joy
Source: Luke 2:10 "Behold, I bring you good news of a great joy..."
Colors: B45, Y26, YR30
Thurs 12/15/11 (no word)
Colors: B41,45, RV95, Y11,21, YR21,30
Fri 12/16/11 Words: Gloria in excelsis
Source: Luke 2:14 "Glory to God in the highest ..."
Colors: Y15, YG63, R000,02,24,35
Sat 12/17/11 Word: Prepare
Colors: E15,41; Sepia, pink, red, and orange Copic multiliners; Micron brown

Sun 12/18/11 Words: Be still
Colors: B14,41, BG45, RV55, Y15, BV20; cobalt 0.5 Copic multiliner; drops of "0" colorless blender
Mon 12/19/11 Words: Lo, how a Rose e'er blooming
Source: Christmas hymn, "Lo, how a Rose e'er blooming from tender stem hath sprung"
Colors: Custom color R290, R00,29,32,35, RV10,17,19,34, G40, YG05,63, Y15, YR15, BG70
Tues 12/20/11 Word: Fulfill
Colors: BG05,45, B05, E41,43,44
Wed 12/21/11 Word: Maranatha
Source: Maranatha is Aramaic for “Come O Lord” 1 Corinthians 16:22
Colors: YG03,05,21,23, V000,12,15,17; purple Copic multiliner
Thurs 12/22/11 Words: Let each heart prepare a home
Source: Advent hymn "On Jordan's bank." There are various translations of the lyrics. My hymnal reads, "Let each heart prepare a home where such a mighty Guest may come."
Colors: Custom color YG6000, YG05,63, Y15, 26,28, YR07, R08,29,59, BG05, E23, G17,24,28
Fri 12/23/11 Word: Follow
Colors: BV08; silver Sanford Uni-Ball gel impact pen
Sat 12/24/11 Words: If in your heart you make a manger for His birth ...
Source: The next line is "then God will once again become a child on earth." Angelus Silesius (1624-1677), tr. by Stephen Mitchell
Colors: Custom color B2000, BG000,53, BV20, R59, W1,3, E23,25,41,81, Y26, YG61

Sun 12/25/11 Words: Christmas Day
Colors: Custom color B2000, B14,41, BG53,70,93, W0,3, G21, YG61, Y26, YR30, E000,00,11,23,41,43,44,53, R00,35, RV32,91,95

Paper: Neenah, 8.5 x 11"

Advent Calendar 2010 - Colors, Words, and Sources

For each of the 28 drawings in my Advent Calendar 2010, here are the Copic colors (and any other materials) that I used, the words, and the sources for quoted words. Unless noted otherwise, everything is drawn and written with black Copic multiliners, generally 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3.

Sun 11/28/2010 Words: We are leaving ordinary time
Source: In the church year, Advent is preceded by a long stretch of “ordinary time,” the summer and fall months after Pentecost. I used the same words to begin my 2009 Advent Calendar and my 2008 Advent Calendar.
Colors: B41,45, BV08, E00,29, Y21,25,28, Sanford Uni-ball gold gel pen
Mon 11/29/2010 Words: Make ye straight what long was crooked
Source: A favorite Advent hymn "Comfort, comfort ye" based on Isaiah 40. The hymn's third verse begins "Make ye straight what long was crooked, make the rougher places plain." For the full words and hymn tune, click here.
Colors: BV000, V04, BG10,45, YR07,20, E000
Tues 11/30/2010 Words: Draw near
Colors: BV04, B21,63,66, Y15; purple and sky blue Copic multiliners
Wed 12/1/2010 Word: Hope
Colors: Custom color YYR2000, BV20, R32,35,59, YG03,63, G12
Thurs 12/2/2010 Words: In God's promise, we rejoice!
Source: Hymn "We walk by faith and not by sight." It's an Easter season hymn, but the line also fits with the Advent season, which is filled with the promise of salvation.
Colors: BV20+Custom color B2000, R08, YR07, Y19, YG05, B01, B66, V04. The colors are a reminder of God's promise, the sign of the rainbow, to Noah after the flood.
Fri 12/3/2010 Word: Prepare
Colors: Custom color YG6000, RV17,32,34, R59; wine multiliner
Sat 12/4/2010
Word: Joy
Colors: B000,01,24,26,41,45, BG05,32,45; cobalt and turquoise multiliners

Sun 12/5/2010 Word: Alleluia
Colors: R32, RV000,29,34, BG93, B24,26, Y15,26, G000, YG63, E000,04,21
Mon 12/6/2010 Words: Joy of every longing heart
Source: Advent hymn “Come, thou long-expected Jesus” - for the full words and hymn tune, click here.
Colors: Custom color B2000, B01,32, BV04, RV91,95, RV13,14, G24; pink multiliner
Tues 12/7/2010 Words: Come, Lord Jesus - Maranatha
Source: Maranatha is Aramaic for “Come O Lord” 1 Corinthians 16:22
Colors: Y21, R02, V04,15,17; purple and orange multiliners
Wed 12/8/2010 Words: Then on earth the Word appears, gracing his created spheres
Source: Advent hymn "Savior of the nations, come" - click here to hear the tune and read the words. I'm quoting from a verse that is in my hymnal but is not shown on line.
Colors: E000,04,25,33,95, W0, G000, BG10,72,93, YR20; sepia multiliner
Thurs 12/9/2010 Words: For us and for our salvation, He came down from heaven
Source: Nicene Creed
Colors: G000, B000, V000, R000; pink, orange, turquoise, and sky blue multiliners
Fri 12/10/2010 Words: Watch in expectation
Colors: YR04,21, B21,24, G28, R29; cobalt and olive multiliners
Sat 12/11/2010 Words: Rejoice and exult with all your heart
Source: Zephaniah 3:14
Colors: V000,04, G07,40, YG05, RV13,17,91, Y15; pink, olive, and purple multiliners

Sun 12/12/2010 Words: Wait for the Lord
Source: Psalm 27:14
Colors: Custom color YG6000, YG63, G000,28,29, BG96, Y28, YR21, BV20, B39,45, RV17,91, R59; cobalt and olive multiliners
Mon 12/13/2010 Word: Light
Colors: Y000,15, Custom color YYR2000, BV00,04,23, B45,63,66; cobalt multiliner
Tues 12/14/2010 Words: Be strong - do not fear!
Source: Isaiah 35:4
Colors: YR04,14,20, Y38, BV31, E41, B41,45
Wed 12/15/2010 Words: Blessings of the season
Colors: B01,21,24, RV17,29,32,34, G12,21,24,28, YG63, BG96; wine, olive, and cool gray multiliners
Thurs 12/16/2010 Word: Mercy
Colors: V000,15, B000, Y000, BG000,32,45,72; purple, pink and cobalt multiliners; silver Sanford Uni-Ball gel pen
Fri 12/17/2010 Words: Be patient, beloved, until the coming of the Lord.
Source: James 5:7
Colors: Y13, BG05, E25, G14
Sat 12/18/2010 Words: This is the Lord for whom we have waited.
Source: Isaiah 25:9
Colors: BV04,23, B41,63,66

Sun 12/19/2010 Word: Veni
Source: Advent hymn "Veni Emmanuel" (O Come, O Come Emmanuel). For the complete words and hymn tune, click here.
Colors: BV20,23, YR07, R08,32,35, B01,05,24, BG32,45,49
Mon 12/20/2010 Words: Arise, shine, for your Light has come.
Source: Isaiah 60:1
Colors: Y13, G14, B01, BG05
Tues 12/21/2010 Word: Peace
Colors: Custom color B2000, B24,45, BV31, V000, 04,17
Wed 12/22/2010 Words: O come, thou Wisdom from on high
Source: Advent hymn "O come, O come, Emmanuel." For the complete words and hymn tune, click here.
Colors: Custom color YYR2000, YR21, B41; sky blue multiliner
Thurs 12/23/2010 Words: We wait for light
Source: Isaiah 59:9
Colors: BV04, B01,14, Y21,38, G28, YG21, R29, RV91, W1,3, E21,25,33,53
Fri 12/24/2010 Christmas Eve Words: Glory to God!
Source: Luke 2:14
Colors: Y11,15,19,21,24,38, B45; orange, sepia, and cobalt multiliners
Sat 12/25/2010 Christmas Day Words: Christ the Savior is born
Source: Christmas carol "Silent Night"
Colors: R000,32, G21,40, B000,01, BG000,45,49,72,75, E000,11

Paper: X-Press It Blending Card, 8.5 x 11"

Thursday, December 27, 1973

Advent Calendar 2009 - Colors, Words, and Sources

First posted on Nov. 29, 2009, and updated daily through December 24 as I added drawings to the calendar.

For each of the 27 drawings in my Advent Calendar 2009, here are the Copic colors (and any other materials) that I used; the words; and sources of quoted words. Everything is drawn or written with black Copic multiliners, generally 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3, unless noted.

Sun 11/29/2009 Words: We are leaving ordinary time.
Source: Advent is the beginning of the church year. It is preceded by a long stretch of “ordinary time,” the summer and fall months after Pentecost.
Note: I used the same words to begin my 2008 Advent calendar.
Colors: V12,15, G40, YG03,63, Y15,24, custom color B2000 mottled with colorless blender "0"
Mon 11/30/2009 Words: Take my moments and my days, let them flow in ceaseless praise.
Source: Not an Advent hymn, but as I looked ahead at the empty squares on my Advent calendar, I found myself singing it. It's the second line of a hymn "Take my life, and let it be consecrated, Lord, to thee." The words are sung with several different tunes, including Hollingside, my favorite. Click here to hear it and to see the rest of the words.
Colors: BG10,32,45,72; Turquoise and Cobalt Multiliners
Tues 12/1/2009 Word: Joy
Colors: R02,24,29,32; Y11,13
Wed 12/2/2009 Words: Lead me in your truth, Your steadfast love.
Source: A few words from Psalm 25, verses 5-6.
Colors: B41,45, E53
Thurs 12/3/2009 Words: To give light to those who sit in darkness
Source: Luke 1:79 (The Song of Zechariah, Luke 1:68-79) Zechariah was the father of John the Baptist.
Colors: Y11,13, V09, BV00, G12,17,28, W1, Olive and Purple Multiliners
Fri 12/4/2009 Words: Your redemption is drawing near.
Source: Luke 21:28
Colors: V000,09, B000,26, G17
Sat 12/5/2009 Word: Watch
Colors: B01,06,26,39, C1,3,5,7, RV13,14,32

Sun 12/6/2009
Words: Come, thou long expected Jesus.
Source: Hymn "Come Thou Long-Expected Jesus." Click here to hear its tune "Stuttgart" and see all the words.
Colors: BV00,04,08, G24,28, Y11,26, E25,29; Gold Sanford Uniball Gel Impact pen
Mon 12/7/2009 Words: The voice of one crying out in the wilderness: "Prepare the way of the Lord..."
Source: Luke 3:4, which quotes from Isaiah 40:3
Colors: B41,45, BV20,23, W0,1,3,5, YG91, E41,43,71
Tues 12/8/2009 Word: Hope
Source: For me, the central theme of the Advent season is hope.
Colors: YG03,05,21, Y11,15; Olive and Orange Multiliners
Wed 12/9/2009 Words: God with us... Emmanuel
Source: Matthew 1:23
Colors: RV91,95, G21, E43, dabbed lightly with colorless blender (0) on terry cloth for the uneven coloring effect
Thurs 12/10/2009 Words: With joy you will draw water from the wells of salvation
Source: Isaiah 12:3
Colors: Custom color B2000, B01,24,32,45, BG32,72
Fri 12/11/2009 Word: Promise
Source: A theme of Advent is that God's promise of salvation is fulfilled.
Colors: RV17,29, R24, Y11, YG21,23,95, G29
Sat 12/12/2009 Word: Veni
Source: An ancient Advent hymn, Veni Emmanuel (Latin), or “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel”
Colors: Y000, RV06, R29, BG32, B24, V04; Pink, Purple, Sky Blue, Turquoise, and Olive Multiliners.

Sun 12/13/2009 Words: Surely it is God who saves me ... I will trust and not be afraid.
Source: Isaiah 12:2
Colors: Custom color B2000, B01,05,21,24, V04,15, BV08, Y38, YR07,21
Mon 12/14/2009 Words: Bear fruits worthy of repentance.
Source: Luke 3:8
Colors: B000, Y000, R59, RV29, E04,43, W3, YG63,91, G17, G21+YG91 (meaning YG91 colored on top of G21 to make a new color, seen at the bottom of the drawing.)
Tues 12/15/2009 Words: From our fears and sins release us.
Source: Hymn "Come Thou Long-Expected Jesus." (Same source as 12/6.) Click here to hear its tune "Stuttgart" and see all the words.
Colors: C1,3,5,7, RV06,13,32, BG10,32, B01
Wed 12/16/2009 Words: Rejoice and exult with all your heart. Rejoice in the Lord always.
Source: Zephaniah 3:14, Philippians 4:4
Colors: R32, E000
Thurs 12/17/2009 Words: Speedily help and deliver us.
Source: Book of Common Prayer, Collect for the 3rd Sunday of Advent (click to open the link, then scroll down)
Colors: G07,40, YG05,21, V04,12, BV04, RV06
Fri 12/18/2009 Words: Sing aloud
Source: Zephaniah 3:14
Colors: YR20,21, R08,29, RV14
Sat 12/19/2009 Words: Stir up your power, O Lord...
Source: Book of Common Prayer, Collect for the 3rd Sunday of Advent (click to open the link, then scroll down) (same source as 12/17.)
Colors: YR20, Y000,19, Custom color B2000, B000,01,26,41,45, BG05, Cobalt Multiliner

Sun 12/20/2009
Words: Sleepers, wake!
Source: The hymn "Sleepers, wake!" Click here to see all the words and to hear its tune, "Wachet auf," written by J.S. Bach.
Colors: G000,12,14, B01, BG05,10, Y15,26, RV000,17,32
Mon 12/21/2009 Word: Joy
Colors: RV10,13, G07, V04, B14,29, Pink Multiliner
Tues 12/22/2009 Words: Blessed is she who believed.
Source: Luke 1:45
Colors: R08, RV59, G12, YG21,63,91,95, custom color B2000, Sepia Multiliner
Wed 12/23/2009 Words: Angels bending near the earth.
Source: Christmas hymn "It came upon the midnight clear, that glorious song of old." Click here to hear its tune "Carol" and see all the words.
Colors: B01,41,45,63, BG000, BV000, V000, RV02, R24, Y000,26, C0, W5, G14,40, E000,11,15,33,71, Turquoise Multiliner
Thurs 12/24/2009 Christmas Eve Word: Expectation
Colors: Y000,26, B32, G21, R02,08, RV29, E000,33,44,53, W1,3
Fri 12/25/2009 Christmas Day Words: O come, let us adore him, Christ the Lord.
Source: Christmas hymn "O come, all ye faithful." Click here to hear its tune "Adeste Fideles" and see all the words.
Colors: B39,41,45, R02, YG91,95, BG93,95, BV20, Y000,26, YR20, W1,5, C0,1, E000,00,25,41,43,44

Paper: Neenah, 8.5x11"

Wednesday, December 26, 1973

Advent Calendar 2008 - What I Learned

Written in late December 2008

Advent 2008 daily calendar drawing - What I learned from doing it
(see calendar post at 12/26/08)
For colors used, words, and sources, click here.

• At first I was apprehensive with all those little boxes on the blank calendar. How would I fill them all up? Would I run out of things to draw? Would I ruin it halfway through week 3? But something emerged every day. And I didn’t ruin it.
• The boxes seemed very small (1 3/8 x 1 5/8 inches), but they were very spacious. My note cards (4 x 6-ish) now seem enormous.
• The words and the drawings illuminated each other – Not “illustrating a word” or “labeling a picture,” as I would have predicted. The spaces have become icon-like for me, windows into someplace else. “We are leaving ordinary time” became true of the calendar.
• I loved seeing the themes and color patterns emerge. Candles for Sundays, blue and beige/yellow for Saturdays, large words to decorate, purple/red/pink, purple and blue, red and green, and brown making a comeback in week 3. The pictures are all very different from each other, but they go together somehow.
• Some days the words came first, and other days the drawing came first. Either way, choosing the words took me deeper into the Advent messages. I spent as much time there as on the drawings, reflecting on the words and the hymns, prayers, or scriptures they came from. Music is embedded too, because of the words.
• The drawing was right-brain, and the word choices were left-brain. Now they are fused together.
• I tried a lot of different techniques, some of them new, like the lace for the 3rd Sunday. The small size encouraged me to try it in a finished picture, even if I might not want it for a larger scale.
• They are all my favorites, and there’s not a single one that I want to do over. This probably ties back to the icon aspect of it. I didn’t expect that. I assumed some would turn out ugly. At the very least, I expected some would be nicer than others.
• I drew things I never thought I could draw – the pressed glass candlestick for the 2nd Sunday, the Nativity scene. And other things I never would have consciously decided to draw – “the Lord is near” with neon glow in week 4, the landscape in week 2, the “way” in week 1.
• Without the Copic markers, I wouldn’t have kept it going. I needed the reinforcement of how beautiful it looked. In the same way, I seem to need the beauty of words, music, liturgy, and space in worship. From my upbringing, I feel I shouldn’t need that so much, but I do.
• I did a lot of pencil layouts and sketching. But the drawings still look free. That makes me happy.
• I loved being able to scan & share with Sybil weekly as I went along. Never thought the scanner on the printer would get so much use.
• It was very soul-satisfying. Just the right pace. I am so glad I tried it.
• When I finished the Nativity drawing, I could feel the weight of 25 days of advent hopes and longings, all resting in that one scene. “The hopes and fears of all the years are met in thee tonight.”

Advent Calendar 2008 - Colors, Words, and Sources

Updated July 2009

For each of the 26 drawings in the Advent Calendar 2008, here are the Copic colors (and any other materials) that I used; the words; and sources of quoted words. Everything is drawn or written with black Copic multiliners, generally 0.1 and 0.3, unless noted.

Sun 11/30/2008 Words: We are leaving ordinary time.
Source: Advent is the beginning of the church year. It is preceded by a long stretch of “ordinary time,” the summer and fall months after Pentecost.
Colors: B41, B45, Y26, YR21, C13, BV31
Mon 12/1/2008 Words: Maranatha – Come Lord Jesus
Source: Maranatha is Aramaic for “Come O Lord” 1 Corinthians 16:22
Colors: BG000, V04, V12, RV14, RV32
Tues 12/2/2008 Words: await, anticipate
Colors: Y15, Y19, B01, B05
Wed 12/3/2008 Words: Prepare the way
Source: Isaiah 40:3
Colors: E00, E04, YG63, streaked with 0 (colorless blender)
Thurs 12/4/2008 Words: Joy
Colors: G40, YG63, Y15, RV32, RV14, R59
Fri 12/5/2008 Words: Hope is a virtue
Source: Hope is one of the themes of Advent. “Hope is a virtue” is a reminder to myself that I need sometimes.
Colors: Wine Multiliner, RV14, G07, YG03, V04, RV29, Y38, BG05, BV00
Sat 12/6/2008 Words: Alleluia!
Colors: Cobalt Multiliner, Y26, YR21, B01, B05, B32, B41, B45
Sun 12/7/2008 Words: We wait for new heavens and a new earth.
Source: 2 Peter 3:13
Colors: Cool Gray Multiliner, B32, Y11, Y19, YR21, C1, W1, Copic Opaque White, white colored pencil
Mon 12/8/2008 Words: Faith, Rejoice
Colors: Wine Multiliner, BG000, B05, B39, V04, V09, V12, V15, with streaks and dots of 0 (colorless blender)
Tues 12/9/2008 Words: Veni
Source: An ancient Advent hymn, Veni Emmanuel (Latin), or “O Come, O Come Emmanuel”
Colors: RV14, RV32, RV29, RV59, G21, G28, YG03
Wed 12/10/08 Words: Love
Colors: Cobalt Multiliner, Y11, Y13, Y15, V04, V12, RV14, RV32
Thurs 12/11/2008 Words: Lift up your voice! Lift it up – do not fear!
Source: Isaiah 40:9
Colors: R00, BG000, BG72, all “painted” with 0 Sketch brush tip
Fri 12/12/2008 Words: Awake
Colors: C1, YG63, G28, G07, R59, Y15, Y38, RV32, RV14
Sat 12/13/2008 Words: Comfort, comfort ye, my people…
Source: Isaiah 40:1
Colors: E41, B41, B45
Sun 12/14/2008 Words: My spirit rejoices in God my Savior.
Source: Luke 1:47 (the Magnificat)
Colors: Sepia Multiliner, Y26,YR24, Y38, B01, B06, RV32, RV14, E00, R24, E09, E25, white Sakura Gelly Roll pen
Mon 12/15/2008 Words: Watch
Drawing Concept: Dec. 2008 tutorial in Marianne Walker’s blog, on coloring pine branches
Colors: YG23, G07, G28, B32, Copic Opaque White
Tues 12/16/2008 Words: Angels in our midst
Colors: Copic Multiliners in purple, pink, and sky blue; gold Sanford Uniball Gel Impact pen; Y11, Y15, BG00, BV00, BG32, G40, G21
Wed 12/17/2008 Words: adore, alight, aware
Colors: Y38, YR21, B01, B05, YR14, E21
Thurs 12/18/2008 Words: Rejoice
Colors: Olive Multiliner, G07, G12, G40, G17, G21, YG23, YG95, YG03, YG63, R59, R24, R29, R08
Fri 12/19/2008 Words: Emmanuel, God with us
Source: Matthew 1:23
Colors: Cobalt and Purple Multiliners; BG72, BG75, Y11, Y15, V04, V09, V15
Sat 12/20/2008 Words: Marvel now, both heaven and earth, that the Lord chose such a birth.
Source: Hymn “Savior of the Nations Come
Colors: E41, YR21, Y26, BG72, BG75, BG00, B01, B05, B41, B45, dots of 0, dots and arcs of Cobalt and Sky Blue Multiliners
Sun 12/21/2008 Words: Joy of every longing heart.
Source: Hymn “Come Thou Long-Expected Jesus
Colors: G40, G21, G28, YG63, YR21, Y26, B14, RV11, RV29
Mon 12/22/2008 Words: The Lord is near.
Source: Philippians 4:5
Colors: Cool Gray Multiliner, C1, C3, R00, R02, R08, R32, B01, BG72, BG75, BG000, BG05, BG45, dots and streaks of 0
Tues 12/23/2008 Words: 1. Let every heart prepare a throne, And every voice a song. 2. Purify our conscience
Sources: 1. Hymn “Hark the Glad Sound, the Savior Comes” (but I prefer this tune for it)
2. Collect for the 4th Sunday of Advent, Book of Common Prayer
Colors: E00,E04, B41, V15, R59, RV14, RV29, RV32; gold Sanford Uniball Gel Impact pen; loops of Purple and Pink Multiliners
Wed 12/24/2008 Christmas Eve Words: Behold
Source: “Behold, I bring you glad tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people” Luke 2:10
Colors: Cobalt, Olive, and Yellow Multiliners; G28, YG63, Y13, YG99, B29, YR26, YR21, Y15; Gold Sanford Uniball Gel Impact pen
Thurs 12/25/2008 Christmas Day Words: Unto us a child is born…
Source: Isaiah 9:6
Colors: W1, W3, W5,E33, E37, YG91, YG95, YG97, E00, R32, E41, E44, B5, B6, B14, B32, E21,Y19, YR21, YR26, E09, YR14, R00, R02, R24, R08, BG00

Friday, December 21, 1973

Advent Calendar Update 26

Edited December 24, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 25

Edited December 23, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar 2009 Updates 1-25

Edited 12/24/2009: This post is out of date. The final calendar has been posted - click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 24

Edited December 22, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 23

Edited December 21, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 22

Edited December 20, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 21

Edited December 19, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Thursday, December 20, 1973

Advent Calendar Update 20

Edited December 18, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 19

Edited December 18, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 18

Edited December 16, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 17

Edited December 15, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 16

Edited December 14, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 15

Edited December 14, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 14

Edited December 13, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 13

Edited December 11, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 12

Edited December 10, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 11

Edited December 9, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 10

Edited December 8, 2010: This post is out of date Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 9

Edited December 7, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 8

Edited December 6, 2010 - This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 7

Edited December 5, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 6

Edited December 4, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 5

Edited December 3, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 4

Edited December 2, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar update 3

Edited December 1, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar update 2

Edited November 30, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Advent Calendar Update 1

Edited Nov. 29, 2010: This post is out of date. Click here for the updated posting.

Wednesday, April 25, 1973

How I Draw

Updated July 2009

As can be seen from my drawings, I'm not a trained artist. I just love to draw and color. Most of the time, I do a line drawing, then color it with my markers. Sometimes I start with a pencil sketch or rough layout, but not always. Sometimes I draw and color alternately.

When I'm not drawing "from life," my drawings often begin with what I call a gesture. An arm movement. A line on a page. That leads to another gesture, another line. At some point, I start to add lines that fit with the lines I already have. Sometimes it begins to look like "something," and I make it look more like that. (Example: Mary 1 of 12) Often I don't know what I'm drawing until I'm well into it, and sometimes when I'm done, I still don't know what it's supposed to be. (Example: Flower or...?) That doesn't bother me.

Do I always end up with a great drawing, even by my standards? No. And it can be an uncomfortable process. A few months ago, I wrote to my friend Sybil:
"For about half of my drawings, there is a point where I think that it's ugly, unfinishable, unsalvageable. I have the strong urge to rip it up. But I've learned to take a breath, turn the paper around, let myself 'commune' with what is there, and wait for it to tell me what it needs. Another line, another color, some shading or whatever. And if I don't rush it, don't get anxious, don't just do 'something, anything' to make it stop - then it turns out beautiful in its own way. And that's my secret for artistic success. I let it be what it is. For some reason, that works for me with lines & markers, but not with crayons or paint or colored pencil."
Another note to Sybil, on a similar topic:
"After I finish a picture that that is near the top of my current 'artistic' capabilities, like the iris, I'm much more critical of the next one, like the gaudy fish. After the subtle, complex shading in the iris, I wanted to make something simple and bright (really bright!), and I did. But when it (the fish) was done, part of me was disappointed, and I had to remind myself that I enjoyed making it, that not every drawing needs to be a pinnacle."

Tuesday, April 24, 1973

Anybody Can Draw and "Try This" Introduction

Updated July 2009

I truly believe that anybody can draw. Yes, that means you. You may not want to draw, and that's fine. But I've talked with many people who have a bit of a longing to draw, or who loved coloring and drawing as children, and who think they can't draw.

If, to you, "a drawing" means "a realistic and convincing detailed portrait" - then maybe it's true, you can't draw that. I can't draw that either. Other things I can't draw (yet) include ovals that aren't wobbly and people with the right length arms. But that doesn't stop me. I love to draw, even when I'm not very good at it. With practice and a few resources to learn from, my skills and my satisfaction increase.

What I mean by "anybody can draw" is the activity of drawing. Moving a pencil or pen across the paper, making shapes, and coloring them. It's extremely relaxing, absorbing, and enjoyable for me. You can do that, too.

For example, take an object with an interesting shape, maybe something from the kitchen, like this tea strainer, and trace around part or all of it. Move it to a different angle on the paper, and trace it again. Add some lines to echo the shapes you just drew. Color it in.

Now you have a drawing. Click here to see what my drawing looked like.

If the 8.5 x 11" page seems too big, draw a 4 x 6" rectangle and work inside that frame for your drawing space. Or use an unruled 4 x 6" index card.

For some of my drawings that I think might be simple and interesting to try for yourself, I wrote easy "how to" directions, with links and a "try this" label. Click on "try this" and then scroll down to give it a try! Please don't copy my work exactly, but do feel free to play with the ideas, creating a new drawing of your own.

You can get started with everyday, inexpensive materials. Almost all of my 1974-76 drawings, plus the bright bird from 1985, were done with just a black Sharpie (try the ultra-fine point) and a set of 24 fine-point Pentel water based markers (called color pens), which work fine with ordinary printer/copier paper or index cards. It's a good way to see if you enjoy the activity of drawing and coloring. (Caution: don't use Copic markers with Sharpies - it will smear.)

If you're a beginner at drawing, and you want to improve your skills, there are many resources to help you. I've listed a few of them here.

Sunday, April 22, 1973

Resources for Drawing

Updated January 2012

There are many resources to help beginners develop their drawing skills, confidence, and enjoyment. I would call myself an "advanced beginner" who is learning with every drawing.

My favorite resource for drawing is a book, Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain, by Betty Edwards. I purchased it in 1981, so I listed the title that I have. The current edition is The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. I can't comment on the validity of her brain science, but the drawing exercises are wonderful. A non-threatening approach to improve your seeing and your ability to "draw what you see."

I've also made use of some internet resources, including:
  • I Like Markers - Draw It Yourself posts - start here, and then for more, click on the DIY label at the end of the post
  • Start Art Tutorials
  • Drawspace Drawing Lessons (some require registration)
  • The Figure Drawing Lab - University of Evansville
  • Illustration Friday - A weekly word to inspire a drawing. Click here to see my "Illustration Friday inspired" posts.
  • Mixed Media Monday - Another weekly word to inspire (updated Jan. 1, 2012: the weekly MMM words ended in March 2011, but the past words and submissions are still posted)

Saturday, April 21, 1973

Try This - Tea Strainer 1 (Full Shapes)

Updated July 2009

First, please read my post, "Anybody Can Draw," if you haven't already. And please don't copy my drawing - but do feel free to use it to inspire your own.

If you're looking for the "try this" version with partial shapes, see the "Anybody Can Draw" post.

For this drawing, use the full 8.5 x 11" page. Select one or two objects with interesting shapes to trace - my tea strainer is just an example. Maybe a pair of scissors, a serving fork with a fancy shaped handle, a pair of eyeglasses folded up, a kitchen gadget, or a child's toy. Also select another, plainer object, such as an oval or diamond shape.

Position your first interesting-shaped object off-center, diagonally on your paper. Trace completely around it, including any holes like the scissors handles. Move it to a different location, different angle, perhaps overlapping the first tracing. Trace around it again. It's up to you whether to stop at the overlap (putting the second tracing "behind" the first) or to continue tracing (as if the first tracing is transparent).

Repeat with your second interesting-shaped object, if desired. Mine was a spoon handle, traced inside the left-hand tea strainer.

Now for your "plainer" object. Position it so it will connect or extend the other objects. Trace it, except where it overlaps (keep it "behind" the other objects). Repeat a few times.

Add free-form curved or straight lines to echo or continue some of your traced lines, to make a new shape, or to criss-cross some blank areas. Consider drawing a small picture inside a space, like I did with my window frame.

Color (but feel free to leave some white space). Enjoy.

For more drawings to try, click on "try this" just below, or in the menu bar in my blog header, or in the label list on the right.

Friday, April 20, 1973

Try This - Doodling on a Tan Card

Updated July 2009

First, please read my post, "Anybody Can Draw," if you haven't already. And please don't copy my drawing - but do feel free to use it to inspire your own.

To try this, draw a 4x6" rectangle, or use an unruled 4x6" index card. Draw 4-5 irregular shapes, scattered across the space. They can be curvy, as shown here, or jagged, like my spiky abstract drawing.

Then draw a few shapes that echo or roughly mirror your first shapes. Example - the three shapes in the upper left of my drawing. Keep going until you've filled up your space pretty well.

Draw some small circles or shapes inside some of your bigger shapes. Color. Enjoy.

For more drawings to try, click on "try this" just below, or in the menu bar in my blog header, or in the label list on the right.

Thursday, April 19, 1973

Try This - Geode

Updated July 2009

First, please read my post, "Anybody Can Draw," if you haven't already. And please don't copy my drawing - but do feel free to use it to inspire your own.

To try this, draw a 4x6" rectangle, or use an unruled 4x6" index card. Draw a small irregular oval or amoeba shape near the center of your drawing space. (Mine is colored dark purple.)

Pick a center point inside your shape, and draw straight lines (rays) radiating out from it. The rays should be varying lengths. Go about halfway around your center shape with the rays, and keep the outer ends of the rays at least 1" away from the edge of your drawing space.

Connect the outer ends of your rays with short, straight (angular) or curvy lines. (Mine are curvy.)

Now, on the opposite side of your center shape, draw curvy, jagged, or wavy lines connecting the outermost rays. (For an example, see my wavy shapes colored in green, yellow, orange, and light blue.)

Finally, draw a few wavy, irregular ovals around the outside of everything (for mine, see the outer rings colored in dark blues and purple).

Color. Enjoy.

For more drawings to try, click on "try this" just below, or in the menu bar in my blog header, or in the label list on the right.

Wednesday, April 18, 1973

Try This - Fish Doodle

Updated July 2009

First, please read my post, "Anybody Can Draw," if you haven't already. And please don't copy my drawing - but do feel free to use it to inspire your own.

To try this, draw a 4x6" rectangle, or use an unruled 4x6" index card. It also works well in a larger size like 8.5 x 11.

Warm up your arm by making circles and loops with your hand above the paper, but without touching it.

Then draw a large oval-like shape with loops inside it. Make the loops different shapes and sizes. If you have room, add some loops outside your main shape (like mine at the lower left).

Add some dots, stripes, and shapes inside your loops. If you have a blank space, you can add another shape, like the flower shape where my fish has his eye. Color, but feel free to leave some white space. Enjoy.

For more drawings to try, click on "try this" just below, or in the menu bar in my blog header, or in the label list on the right.

Tuesday, April 17, 1973

Try This - Bright Dots and Wavy Lines

Posted August 17, 2009

First, please read my post, "Anybody Can Draw," if you haven't already. And please don't copy my drawing - but do feel free to use it to inspire your own.

To try this, draw a 4x6" rectangle, or use an unruled 4x6" index card. Draw 8-10 wavy lines lengthwise across your drawing space. Let some of the lines curve away from each other, to make room for bigger circles.

Add various sized circles. Don't worry about perfect circles, but do try for smooth joins where you close your shapes. Let some of your circles be cut off by the edges of your drawing space. Color. Enjoy.

For more drawings to try, click on "try this" just below, or in the menu bar in my blog header, or in the label list on the right.

Monday, April 16, 1973

Try This - Two Shapes (Turtles)

Updated July 2009

First, please read my post, "Anybody Can Draw," if you haven't already. And please don't copy my drawing - but do feel free to use it to inspire your own.

To try this, draw a 4x6" rectangle, or use an unruled 4x6" index card. Select an irregular object, about 3" long. Mine was a ceramic turtle that I made in grade school.



Place it on your drawing space, 1/2" or less off center. Trace completely around it.

Now move it, 1" or less, to the other side of your drawing space's center line. Trace completely around it again. Add curved or straight lines, if desired, to break up the blank space inside your tracings.

Draw one or two continuous lines around the entire image, about 1/8" to 1/4" apart. Color. Enjoy.

For more drawings to try, click on "try this" just below, or in the menu bar in my blog header, or in the label list on the right.

Sunday, April 15, 1973

Try This - Landscape with Animal

Updated July 2009

First, please read my post, "Anybody Can Draw," if you haven't already. And please don't copy my drawing - but do feel free to use it to inspire your own.

This is like my other examples with tracing (turtles, tea strainer) except that, instead of tracing a real-life object, you will create your own shape to trace. My frog panel drawing is another example where I made patterns that I traced around, a sitting frog and a jumping frog.

To try this, in addition to your drawing paper, you will need an extra piece of paper or a piece of lightweight cardboard like an index card.

First take your "extra" paper or card. On it, draw an animal as viewed from the side. Don't worry about how it looks. A body, head with ears, four legs, and a tail. Mine included a mane (colored red in my drawing.) Consider angling the front or back legs, like I did, for a moving animal. Now draw a smooth, curved line all around the outside of your animal drawing. (Think of an old-fashioned cookie cutter shape.) Cut it out with scissors along that line. This is your pattern.

Next, on your drawing paper, draw a 4x6" rectangle, or use an unruled 4x6" index card. (Note for card makers - Use any size that you'd like for your top card layer.) Place your pattern on your drawing space, perhaps at an angle if your animal is moving. Trace all around it, keeping your lines smooth and curved. Add a dot for the eye. Add lines to separate the legs if needed. Add a few more lines, like my animal's ear and tail, or extend the leg lines a little way up into the body.

For your landscape, add a wavy horizontal line for the horizon, a scalloped or curvy shaped cloud, and some ovals on one side for rocks. You can also add a road, like my drawing, by drawing a pair of curvy diagonal lines (you can improve on my example if you bring your lines closer together as they get near the top, for perspective).

Your drawing may look more finished if you double or triple some of your lines, like I did, by drawing similar lines alongside your cloud, road, rock, or horizon lines. Color. Enjoy.

For more drawings to try, click on "try this" just below, or in the menu bar in my blog header, or in the label list on the right.

Saturday, April 14, 1973

Try This - Star Circle

Updated July 2009

First, please read my post, "Anybody Can Draw," if you haven't already. And please don't copy my drawing - but do feel free to use it to inspire your own.

To try this, draw a 4x6" rectangle, or use an unruled 4x6" index card. Draw or trace a large circle on it. Your circle may be cut off on one edge of your drawing space, like mine is on the top. In the center of your large circle, draw or trace a small circle, about 1" in diameter.

Around the center circle, draw a five-lobed star shape, with rounded "points" and rounded at the inside turns, where it nears the center circle. Your shape will look more interesting if it's not "perfect," so don't aim too hard for symmetry, but do aim for smooth turns and a smooth join where you connect the end of your star's line to its starting point. Remember, it's OK to move your paper - try turning it as you draw your star shape.

Now draw stripes or curves, following your circles or along the star's lobes. If you like, you can segment a shape, like I did with my largest star shape, to divide it into smaller shapes for coloring. Inside the small circle, you may want to draw stripes or more circles, or another small star, or a pinwheel like I drew.

To ground your image, draw a few horizontal lines with your pen, or perhaps with just your markers, like mine.

Color. Enjoy.

For more drawings to try, click on "try this" just below, or in the menu bar in my blog header, or in the label list on the right.

Friday, April 13, 1973

Try This - Bookplate Landscape

Updated July 2009

First, please read my post, "Anybody Can Draw," if you haven't already. And please don't copy my drawing - but do feel free to use it to inspire your own.

To try this, draw a 4x6" rectangle, or use an unruled 4x6" index card. Place it vertically -"portrait" orientation instead of "landscape."

Draw a line of upside-down U's or scallops across the top. It's OK if they are cut off at the top, like mine. Draw a few similar lines alongside your first line.

Just above the center of your drawing space, draw a sun, a crescent moon, or several star shapes. Add some curved lines, lifting your pen at your sun-moon-star shapes, so the lines go "behind" them. You can add some dot or line patterns inside your new curved stripes.

For the bottom half of your drawing space, draw a line of tree tops with a few scallopy curves and upside-down V's. You can also draw some tree trunks - pairs of almost-vertical lines up from the bottom, centered under a curve or V. Make each pair of lines a bit closer together at the top than at the bottom. Consider adding a branch or two, by leaving a small gap in one of your vertical lines, then angling a pair of branch lines up for a short distance.

Now draw the leafy part of your trees, using rounded swirling lines under your curved tree tops, and angular lines under your V's. Color (or leave uncolored). Enjoy.

For more drawings to try, click on "try this" just below, or in the menu bar in my blog header, or in the label list on the right.

Thursday, April 12, 1973

Try This - Heart Drawing

Updated July 2009

First, please read my post, "Anybody Can Draw," if you haven't already. And please don't copy my drawing - but do feel free to use it to inspire your own.

To try this, draw a 4x6" rectangle, or use an unruled 4x6" index card. Draw a heart shape slightly off to one side. Don't worry about a perfect shape - for this drawing, symmetry is not important. An imperfect heart shape will go better with your (likely to be imperfect) ovals.

Note: if you do want a perfect heart shape, you can cut a pattern, as many of us learned in childhood. Fold paper in half, cut a comma shape, unfold, look at what you have, refold and recut until you like it. Then trace around it for your drawing. That's how I drew the hearts for 12/23 of my 2008 Advent Calendar drawing, and also the heart-shaped outline for Confined in the Heart.

If you like, draw little scallops around the edge of your heart shape. Add tiny hearts, curvy triangles, pointed ovals, or comma shapes inside your heart shape. This necklace may give you some ideas.


Next, draw 6-8 small hearts on one side of your large heart shape. Draw some crescent shapes on the other side, and top them with a few simple flower shapes, or curvy commas and ovals for petals.

Add two oval lines that reach all around, making a ribbon below the shapes. Perfection is not the goal here. My drawing, for example, has very imperfect ovals. You can double each line (a second line about 1/8" from the first line) or add little scallops like mine.

Color. Enjoy.
(Note: I used muted colors for my drawing, but you may want to try some bright colors. Don't feel limited to pink or red.)

For more drawings to try, click on "try this" just below, or in the menu bar in my blog header, or in the label list on the right.

Wednesday, April 11, 1973

Try This - Outlined Words

Posted January 2010

First, please read my post, "Anybody Can Draw," if you haven't already. And please don't copy my drawing - but do feel free to use it to inspire your own.

If you can write or print neatly and legibly, you can successfully do this technique. It does not require calligraphy skills or "beautiful" handwriting. Simply outlining your words will make them look much more polished and finished.

STEP ONE: To try this, draw a 4x6" rectangle, or use an unruled 4x6" index card. Select a few different colored markers. SLOWLY write or print a few words with the fine tip of your marker, or the pointed tip of a chisel tip marker, or brush tip - whatever is comfortable for you. By moving slowly, you will have better control, and you will also create a somewhat thicker line. A few tips:
  • Make your loops and circles a bit larger (more open) than usual.
  • Write your words at different angles to look more interesting, and also to conceal any unevenness in the letters.
  • Try using several different colors for the letters of one word.
  • Use more than one style of writing, such as printing and cursive writing.
See the drawing above, for Step One of my drawing.

STEP TWO: Now, take your black drawing pen and outline the letters, tracing all the way around the outer shape of the word. Keep a smooth line and flow as you go around. Next, trace the insides of the letters, such as the inside circle of the o's or the inside half-circle of the e's. A few tips:
  • You don't need to draw your outline exactly alongside your colored lines. Instead, you can leave some blank space as you draw the outline, if you want a thicker-looking word. After you finish outlining, go back and color in the blank spots.
  • This can also be a good way to fix a letter that looks too short. For example, my "l" in "light" looked like an "e," so I made it taller when I outlined it.
  • Your outline should go around, not cross over, any loops, such as my "h" in "hope" and "l" in "light."
See the drawing at the right for Step Two of my drawing. I also added a few simple flower shapes, colored with the same colors as my words, to fill in some of my empty spaces.

STEP THREE: Fill in the blank spots remaining in your outlines. Enjoy.

For more drawings to try, click on "try this" just below, or in the menu bar in my blog header, or in the label list on the right.

Tuesday, April 10, 1973

Try This - Flowers in Shallow Bowl

Updated July 2009

First, please read my post, "Anybody Can Draw," if you haven't already. And please don't copy my drawing - but do feel free to use it to inspire your own.

This drawing looks complicated, but it's not. It is time consuming to draw and color, but you may find that you enjoy the process (I know I did). To try it, draw a 4x6" rectangle, or use an unruled 4x6" index card.

With pencil, very lightly draw a shallow bowl shape, a little more than 1" high. (Look at the right side of my bowl for its height, because the left and center is partly covered with flowers.) Or, to get a more symmetrical shape, fold a piece of paper or an index card (lined paper will make it easier) and cut straight across the top and bottom, with a curve for the sides. Unfold it and trace around it lightly with pencil.

Next, about halfway down the side of the bowl, lightly draw a straight horizontal pencil line for the table top. Do NOT ink your bowl or table lines yet.

Now switch to ink. Draw a few flowers scattered above your bowl. My flowers have circles or ovals for their centers, just big enough to color, with 6-8 wedge-shaped petals. Try curving both ends of the petals.

Continue drawing with lots of similar flower shapes in varying sizes. I have dozens of flowers, but you can do fewer. Don't try to make all your flowers identical, just similar. Let some flowers overlap the bowl or table lines.

Be sure to show some flowers from a side view, by drawing a narrow oval center (vertical or horizontal) with very short petals on one side.

Add some stem lines in the blank areas between your flowers, and some pointed oval leaves poking out of the mass of flowers.

Ink the bowl shape and the table line, where they are not covered with flowers. Before coloring, gently erase any pencil lines that are still visible. Add a pattern to the bowl or table top if you like. My coloring was complex for the flowers, but simple coloring would also look good.

Color. Enjoy.

For more drawings to try, click on "try this" just below, or in the menu bar in my blog header, or in the label list on the right.

Monday, April 9, 1973

Try This - Rosette

Posted November 16, 2009

First, please read my post, "Anybody Can Draw," if you haven't already. And please don't copy my drawings - but do feel free to use them to inspire your own. To see the original posts with these drawings, click here for orange and here for blue.

If you can trace a circle shape from a jar lid and make "V" and "U" shaped lines, you have all the drawing skills you need for a rosette. There's nothing tricky about it. You'll need some patience to draw all the little V's and U's, but you might find it relaxing, perhaps even meditative, as I do.
  • If you'd prefer something less detailed, click here for other "try this" opportunities, or click on "try this" in the labels list on the right, or in the menu bar in my blog header.
To try a rosette of your own, first draw very lightly, with a pencil, three concentric circles. The biggest should be about 3 inches across. You can trace around small cans, spice jar lids, tiny bowls, or glasses. See the three circles in Example A, below, to get the idea, but don't make them as dark as that! (I made mine dark so you can see them.) They should be drawn very faintly, to be easily erased when you finish drawing and before you start coloring.

Next, choose a foundation shape. Your rosette will be built on this shape. In Example A on the right, my heavy lines show you the foundation shape that I used for my orange and yellow drawing. But when you draw your foundation shape (after reading about Example B below), don't make your lines extra-heavy like that. Except for your very light pencil circles, all your lines will be the same weight - whatever your drawing pen gives you.


For your foundation shape, you can choose from many different shapes - see Example B to the right for a few of them. To read my handwritten notes, double click on the picture for a larger version. Please notice a few things about the line that forms each of the different foundation shapes:
  • It moves back and forth between the inner and middle circles as boundaries.
  • It's a continuous, unbroken line. (Though it's fine to start and stop as you're drawing it.)
  • It can be very irregular! Don't try for a perfectly regular foundation shape - it's not important for this drawing. An imperfect shape will make your rosette more interesting as you go along.
Which shape should you use? Really, it won't make much difference to the finished rosette, because it pretty much disappears as you work with it. So just choose one that you feel will be easy for you to draw.

Now, with your drawing pen, draw your foundation shape with one continuous line, using your smallest (lightly penciled) circle for the inner boundary, and your middle circle for the outer boundary. As you draw, don't worry about the number of rays or petals - five or more will work, and an odd or even number doesn't matter.

Next, you will add as many sets of V's and U's as you like! Please read the tips below. Also look at my two-page Example C at the bottom for a rosette at various steps along the way. In my twelve little drawings (C-1 through C-12), I used blue to highlight the V, U, or straight line that I was adding.

Tips:
  • Always finish a complete round of V's or U's before starting a new round. This will avoid confusion, as I've learned the hard way.
  • A variety of V's and U's will make it more interesting.
  • Use your lightly pencilled circles as guidelines. They will help you keep your overall circular shape, although your V's and U's will vary.
  • Keep your outer edge "rough," so you always have easy places to anchor your V's and U's. This tip will make more sense when you look at Example C below.
  • Every rosette will be different. There is no "right way" to draw it.
  • When is it finished? Whenever you like! In Example C, I could have stopped anywhere from C-3 onward.
  • Remember to gently erase your circles. Then color! Enjoy!
Double click either picture below for a larger view.


Edited Nov. 21, 2009: See below for colored version of rosette from Example C above.

For more drawings to try, click on "try this" just below, or in the menu bar in my blog header, or in the label list on the right.

Wednesday, February 21, 1973

About Sybil and Her Drawings


Updated July 2009

Though we live far apart, Sybil and I have been friends for many years. I introduced her to drawing with markers in 1981. Then in 2008, after I had stopped drawing for many years, she re-introduced me to drawing with Copic markers in 2008. We share our drawings and thoughts with each other via e-mail. It's great to have a drawing partner.

Since 2004, Sybil has included drawing (she would say doodling) in her prayer life. She wrote a wonderful book about that, Praying in Color, and she gives workshops all over the country. Her book's website includes some examples of her prayer drawings. Edited February 20, 2010: There are more on her current blog, as well as her previous (2009) blog.

In my blog, I've included some of her "non-prayer" drawings (with her permission), including the one in this post.

Thursday, January 25, 1973

My Copic Colors

Updated December 28, 2011
Caution: colors can vary with your paper, and the computer may not look true to life.

I was introduced to Copic markers in August 2008 (thank you, Sybil!) Since then, almost all my drawings use Copic colors and multi-liners. For many of those drawings, I've listed the "Copic colors used" in my blog posts.

This chart is my personal reference chart for my Copic colors. It's a Word table (13 columns, 27 rows) that I created and printed on my usual Neenah paper (Classic Crest, Solar White, smooth, 80 lb. cover weight). Whenever I buy a new marker, I color it in. I keep the chart out of the light when not in use, because the colors will fade with exposure.

An "s" means that a color is available in the Sketch type marker, but not the Original type which I generally prefer. A "c" means that it's one of my custom colors (formulas listed at the bottom of the chart) - for more information, scroll down to my "custom colors" post (or if you don't see that post, click here and then scroll down).

Also included in my chart are a few unlikely combinations that I use a lot, two markers colored on top of each other: YG91+G21, BG32+G12, and B41+BV31.

On my chart, I omitted the N and T grays (neutral and toner) because, for my markers, I chose the C and W grays (cool and warm). Also I omitted the F (fluorescent) colors, except for my FV2 at the bottom left, which in real life is a bright purple, not blue as it looks in the scan.

If you'd like a copy of the blank chart for your own use, please leave me a comment here. I'll be happy to post it.

Wednesday, January 24, 1973

Custom Colors

Updated November 26, 2010. This post is a supplement to my Color Chart.

My first custom color mix is shown below on the left. I call it B2000. It's my name for a very pale blue in the B2_ color range. For comparison, the chart includes some similar pale colors (ending in 0's) B000, BG000, and BG10, and also B21, B24, and B26, a few of the darker colors from the B2n grouping. My B2000 recipe is 1 part B24 and 24 parts colorless blender. I could have made it with B21 instead (using more ink and less colorless blender).

Added April 17, 2010: Posted below on the right is my custom color YYR2000, made with 1 part Y11, 1 part YR20, and 3 parts colorless blender.
Added November 26, 2010: I made custom color YG6000 (not shown) with 1 part YG63 and 5 parts colorless blender.
Added September 18, 2011: Sometimes R29 is too dark and saturated, but the lighter R2n's weren't what I wanted. For example, I love R24 but, to me, it looks more orangey than R29. So I made custom color R290 (not shown) with 1 part R29 and 1 part colorless blender.
Added July 7, 2013: I made FV25 (not shown) with 1 part FV2 and 4 parts colorless blender. 


Caution: colors can vary with your paper, and the computer may not look true to life.

In some cases, the Copic users who mix custom colors were creating paler colors in the 0 series (paler versions of the existing B000, Y000, and so on). As of July 2009, there were new extra-pale colors that might be perfect for them. But what I wanted with B2000 was something in the B2n grouping, which is grayer and less bright than B000.

Marianne Walker's I Like Markers post here explains how to mix custom colors. To understand the Copic color numbering system, look at her Copic Glossary, near the bottom right of her blog pages, for descriptions of Color Family, Color Saturation, and Color Group. Her post here tells more about the color numbering system.

Sunday, January 21, 1973

My Watercolor Charts: (1) Dr. Ph. Martin's Radiant Concentrated Water Colors and (2) Lyra Aquacolor Crayons

Posted February 16, 2010
Note: if you're looking for my Copic marker chart, please click here.

The color charts above show my two different types of watercolors:
  • On the left - Dr. Ph. Martin's Radiant Concentrated Water Colors
  • On the right - Lyra Aquacolor Crayons
At the bottom of this post are the same two charts, scanned separately.

Watercolors work well with Copic markers and Copic multiliners, both of which are waterproof.

Dr. Ph. Martin's Radiant Concentrated Water Colors
  • Liquid dyes in little glass eyedropper bottles. These are my FAVORITE watercolors because of their amazingly radiant, transparent colors.
  • You can buy individual colors (1/2 ounce each), or sets of 14. There are 42 colors in total. For many years I had just six colors, but recently I bought a set of 14 (the A set), shown in my chart.
  • My 35-year old bottles still worked fine - no change in the watercolor that I could see. I replaced them because I thought the rubber in the eyedropper might deteriorate and crack some day.
  • I usually put 1-2 drops of a color into the well of a watercolor palette. Then I add 1-2 drops of water, for an intense color, or 1/4-1/2 teaspooon of water, for a paler wash. A little goes a long way on my usual small-scale paper (4 x 6").
  • Because the colors are dye-based, they are not lightfast (will fade with extended exposure to UV light such as sunlight or fluorescent light). If you plan to display something made with this product, it will need UV protection. Click here for my post on how I store and protect my drawings and materials.
  • The colors mix well with each other.
  • I like using a color chart, because the colors are so concentrated that the glass bottle, or even a drop of color on the watercolor palette, doesn't really show how it will look on paper.
  • I made my chart on 4x6" watercolor paper. Each circle is about 1" diameter.
  • The colors on my screen look pretty true to life, except that 3A and 4A are really more orange (they look too blue on the screen).
  • Click here to see my drawings that use Dr. Ph. Martin's Radiant Concentrated Water Colors.
  • Click here and here for more information about these water colors.
Lyra Aquacolor Crayons
  • Water colors in solid crayon form. The colors are more opaque than my Dr. Ph. Martin's colors, which look very transparent. Both are beautiful in different ways.
  • I have a set of 24. Sets of 12 or 36 are also available.
  • I use a wet (but not dripping) brush to pick up the color directly from the crayons and apply it to my wet watercolor paper. You can also shave off a small amount and mix with a little water.
  • The colors mix well with each other. They are said to be lightfast.
  • I like using a color chart, because the crayons in the box (my set has 24) don't give a good idea of the dissolved color on paper.
  • I made my chart on 4x6" watercolor paper. Each section is 1" square.
  • In each section, the top left dot is solid crayon colored on dry paper, and the bottom left dot is the same thing, but then dissolved with a wet brush, trying not to spread the color out very much. The right side is a streak of color picked up from the crayon with a wet brush, then applied to the dry paper.
  • The colors on my screen look pretty true to life, except #37 is really more purple (looks too blue on the screen) and #13 is really more yellow (looks too red on the screen).
  • Click here to see my drawings that use Lyra Aquacolor crayons.
  • Click here for more information about the crayons.
Paper: Canson Montval watercolor block, 140 lb. cold press, 4x6"